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قال سيدنا عمر بن الخطاب رضي الله عنه ( … لو ان دابة في ارض العراق تعثرت … لسئلت عنها …) فكيف بشعب يقتل وتقول لا تدري لو لم يكن لك يد فاين المجرمين الذين قتلو شعب الم تستطع ان تحميهم ام ان اشهر الاحتجاجات غير كافية غريب انا اسمع ان دولتك لديهاعشرات الفروع من المخابرات الغير موجود بدول اخرى تنصت على مكالمات بحيث ان القاء القبض على السياسين المعارضين تكون بشكل قياسي اي لو نحلة طارت لتعرف عيب… عليك عيب والله جننتني

xDA039Dzwwk

the fall had come and we become older,
 but you know that after the winter there always a spring ,
cheer up,
be happy and know that
the dawn is coming after the dark .

Job Interview

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gHXKitKAT1E

LICENCE & CERTIFICATION

There are two
types of jobs in Canada: regulated occupations and non-regulated
occupations
. To work in a regulated occupation, you must have a
license.

Occupation
Regulated by Province / Territory

This occupation is not regulated in Canada.
What does this mean?

Regulated vs.
Non-Regulated Occupation

This occupation
does not require certification in Ontario.

In Canada, some
provinces and territories regulate certain professions and trades while others
do not. If you have a licence to work in one province, your licence may not be
accepted in other provinces or territories.

Most regulatory
bodies and apprenticeship authorities have their own Web sites that provide
information on licensing, eligibility requirements, foreign credential
recognition, registration fees and contact information. Contact information for
the relevant regulatory body can be found below (if applicable).

Newcomers and Foreign
Credential Recognition: Who should recognize your credentials?

  • Regulated
    Occupation
    : If your
    occupation is regulated, credential assessment and recognition is usually
    completed by a regulatory body. Contact information for the relevant
    regulatory body can be found below (if applicable).
  • Non-Regulated Occupation: If your occupation is non-regulated, employers will be interested
    in learning about your education and work experience. This information can
    be summarized in a resume. Employers may be interested in the Canadian
    equivalency to your international educational credentials. For a fee, a
    provincial credential assessment agency can assess your credentials.
    Contact information for the relevant credential assessment agency can be
    found below (if applicable).

TIP:
A credential assessment takes time and costs money. Check with a regulatory
body or other organization to determine if you need an assessment before
spending money on an assessment that is not required or recognized.

Provincial
credential assessment services assess academic credentials for a fee. The
assessment will tell you how your education compares with educational standards
in the province or territory where you are planning to settle. An assessment
may help you in your job search.

World Education Services
Canada (WES)

Comparative
Education Service (University of Toronto)

International Credential
Assessment Service (ICAS) of Canada

To learn more about regulated and non-regulated
occupations, consult the Occupations
in Canada
section of the Guide to
Working in Canada
.

Fact Sheet for
Internationally Trained Individuals

Are you an
internationally trained individual looking for guidance on foreign credential
recognition in your profession in Canada? This occupational fact sheet can help
you by providing information on:

  • the general requirements to work in your profession
  • the steps that you can take to find the most reliable sources of
    information

Information
and Communications Technology
(PDF Format
– Size: 717 KB)

[
Source: Foreign
Credentials Referral Office – Citizenship and Immigration Canada

]

MAIN DUTIES

 

Main duties are
significant tasks or activities common to an occupation.

Use this section to confirm that your skills and experience correspond to the
selected occupation. This section can also be used to help write a résumé.

Job Duties

Computer programmers perform some or all of the
following duties:

  • Write, modify, integrate and test software code
  • Maintain existing computer programs by making modifications as
    required
  • Identify and communicate technical problems, processes and
    solutions
  • Prepare reports, manuals and other documentation on the status,
    operation and maintenance of software
  • Assist in the collection and documentation of user’s requirements
  • Assist in the development of logical and physical specifications
  • May lead and co-ordinate teams of computer programmers
  • May research and evaluate a variety of software products.

Interactive media developers perform some or all of
the following duties:

  • Program animation software to predefined specifications for
    interactive CDs, DVDs, video game cartridges and internet-based
    applications
  • Program special effects software for film and video applications
  • Write, modify, integrate and test software code for e-commerce and
    other Internet applications
  • Assist in the collection and documentation of user’s requirements
  • Assist in the development of logical and physical specifications
  • May lead and co-ordinate teams of interactive media developers
  • May research and evaluate a variety of interactive media software
    products.

[ Source: National Occupational Classification 2006 – HRSDC ]

JOB AND SKILLS REQUIREMENTS

 

Use this section
to confirm that your skills, experience and education correspond to the
selected occupation. This section can also be used to help write a résumé.

Employment
Requirements

Employment
requirements are prerequisites generally needed to enter an occupation.

A bachelor’s degree in computer science or in
another discipline with a significant programming component

or

Completion of a college program in computer science is usually required.

Specialization in programming for engineering and
scientific applications requires specific post-secondary study or experience.

[ Source: National Occupational Classification 2006 – HRSDC]

Essential Skills

Canadian employers
place a strong emphasis on Essential Skills in the workplace. These skills are
used in nearly every occupation, in many different ways, and at different
levels of complexity.

The Essential
Skills include:
Reading, Document Use,
Writing, Numeracy, Oral Communication, Thinking Skills, Working with Others,
Computer Use, and Continuous Learning.

(1) The Essential
Skills
most important for Computer Programmers are:

Skill

Examples of how this skill is applied in the workplace

Problem Solving

  • inherit software projects
    abandoned by other programmers. They sometimes find that the programming
    is inconsistent and messy because it was written by a number of previous
    programmers, each with a different style. Computer programmers clean up
    the programming of the applications, section by section, always ensuring
    that the applications behave as expected and that no interruptions occur
    at the users’ end.
  • encounter ‘bugs’ in new
    software applications or errors while programming. For example, they may
    find that interactive features on websites are not responding as
    expected. Errors may result from a wide range of factors, some of which
    are unknown. Computer programmers troubleshoot the system, methodically
    testing one component at the time until the bug is found. Once the
    culprit code lines have been identified, they modify them and test
    applications to ensure proper functioning. In some cases, the process is
    one of trial and error until software applications function as
    originally intended.
  • find that software designs
    do not meet clients’ expectations. They call a meeting with clients and
    information technology experts to clarify expectations and designs. They
    redesign and make the required changes to the software code to get
    projects back on track and client satisfaction.

 

Skill

Examples of how this skill is applied in the workplace

Computer Use

  • use communications
    software. For example, they exchange e-mail and attach documents with
    colleagues and clients, create address lists, schedule meetings and send
    invitations to participants.
  • use word processing. For
    example, they create, edit and format documents such as reports,
    proposals, user guides, workflow plans, schedules and specifications
    documents.
  • use graphics software. For
    example, they manipulate photographs of clients’ products by adjusting
    size, colour or contrast. They create animations and visual
    representations of clients’ products. They may also use presentation
    software such as PowerPoint to create slide shows outlining the
    development process for websites including components such as
    methodology, architecture, data access and ‘lookup.’
  • use spreadsheets. For
    example, they create list of tasks and timelines for projects, track
    feedback or comments, build tables and graphs, program macros to produce
    statistics and transform list of data into different kinds of lists.
  • use the Internet. For
    example, they perform searches for programming code, information about
    software or solutions to problems. They visit vendors’ web sites,
    participate in exchange forums and post descriptions of problems on
    bulletin boards. They visit and evaluate a variety of web sites for
    specific features and functions and may connect directly to clients’
    systems to find and fix programming errors.
  • use databases. They
    design, create, manage, update and query the databases. They may use
    database application development tools to develop custom software
    specific to clients’ needs.
  • Do programming and systems
    and software design. For example, they develop web pages with
    interactive or animation features, create interfaces for databases,
    develop information management systems with query capabilities, create
    capability to validate information, program e-mail messaging features,
    and link various documents, tables and web pages. Computer programmers
    require specialized knowledge of multiple computer languages, codes and
    mastery of many other system development applications. They must be able
    to identify when a particular language is best suited for a given
    application and offer the capability to program the features and
    functions to meet clients’ needs.

 

Skill

Descriptions

Continuous Learning

Computer programmers set their own
learning goals and are responsible for identifying learning resources. They
regularly consult co-workers, colleagues and supervisors and learn from these
discussions. They also learn by reading trade magazines, software manuals,
user guides and numerous online resources. Computer programmers participate
in formal training activities such as taking courses on particular technical
topics through off-site training organized by vendors or at a college or
university. They also attend professional conferences or seminars offered
through professional associations. The information technology field is fast
paced and computer programmers must constantly maintain and update their
skills.

To
learn more about the remaining Essential Skills, consult Human Resources and
Skills Development Canada’s Essential
Skills Profile
for this
occupation.

[Source:
Essential
Skills Profile
]

Additional
Information:

Progression to information systems analyst,
software engineer or Web designer is possible with experience.

[Source:
National
Occupational Classification 2006 – HRSDC
]

Canada’s
Official Languages

Canada has two
official languages: English and French. Depending on where you decide to live,
you may be required to work in English, French, or in both languages. How well
you can communicate in English or French is important to work in Canada.

Many regulated
occupations require official proof of language skills. Obtaining official
documentation, such as language test results, costs money. Some regulators may
only accept official language documentation from specific organizations.

For
additional information on the importance of language skills for working in
Canada, consult the Communications
Skills
section of WorkinginCanada.gc.ca.

Getting your
language skills assessed

If you do not know
what your English or French language level is, visit one of the Language
Assessment Centres
(http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/publications/welcome/wel-22e.asp)
across Canada. They will assess your language level and direct you to the
appropriate language training program.

Service Centre

Language Training

Language Assessment

Address

(Map will open in new window)

Chatham Kent Council on Adult Language & Learning

Available

Not

Available

48 Fifth St. , Suite 301

Chatham, Ontario

N7M 4V8

View MapView Map

Greater Essex County DSB

Not

Available

Available

1410 Ouelette Av. ,

Windsor, Ontario

N8X 5B2

www.gecdsb.on.ca

View MapView Map

Multicultural Council of Windsor and Essex County

Available

Not

Available

245 Janette Ave. ,

Windsor, Ontario

N9A 4Z2

www.themcc.com

View MapView Map

New Canadian Centre of Excellence

Available

Not

Available

660 Ouelette ,

Windsor, Ontario

N9A 1C1

View MapView Map

South Essex Community Council

Available

Not

Available

215 Talbot St. E. ,

Leamington, Ontario

N8H 3X5

www.secc.on.ca

View MapView Map

Windsor Women Working With Immigrant Women

Available

Not

Available

500 Ouellete Ave ,

Windsor, Ontario

N9A 1B3

www.wwwwiw.org

View MapView Map

Women’s Enterprise Skills Training of Windsor

Available

Not

Available

647 Oulette Ave. , Suite 201

Windsor, Ontario

N9A 4J4

www.westofwindsor.com

View MapView Map

YMCA of Sarnia Lambton – ISAP Services

Available

Available

660 Oakdale Avenue ,

Sarnia, Ontario

N7V 2A9

www.ymcasar.org

View MapView Map

YMCA Windsor and Essex County

Available

Not

Available

500 Victoria St ,

Windsor, Ontario

N9A 4M8

www.windsor.essex.ymca.ca

View MapView Map

[
Source: Citizenship
and Immigration Canada
]

Improving your
language skills

The Government of
Canada provides language training programs for newcomers in cooperation with
provinces, territories and non-governmental organizations. Contact the language
training centre in your city or town to find out what programs are offered.

There are also
many non-governmental organizations in Canada that offer English and French
language programs for a fee.

Visit
the Studying in Canada section of the Going to Canada – Immigration
Portal

(http://www.goingtocanada.gc.ca) for a list of
English and French language programs across Canada.

[
Source: Citizenship
and Immigration Canada
]

 

Potential
Employers

For a list of potential employers, visit the
following site: Labour
Market Information

RSS Feed for Job
Bank listings

Subscribe to the
Canada’s National Job Bank and receive automatic job posting updates for the
location and occupation you have selected. Subscribe to
this RSS Feed

Where to look
for job opportunities

You can also
expand your search by visiting other online job search
resources

(http://www.jobbank.gc.ca/othsite-eng.aspx).
In addition to job postings, many people search for work in Canada through
networking. Networking is the way to search for jobs in Canada’s hidden
job market
.

To learn more about Networking, visit the Find a Job
in Canada
section.

Where people in
this occupation find jobs in Canada

This table shows
the industry sectors employing the highest number of people in this occupation.

Industry / Sector

%

Professional, scientific and technical services

46.10

Information and cultural industries

12.40

Manufacturing

9.00

Finance and insurance

8.20

Public administration

7.80

[
Source: 2006
Census – Statistics Canada
| Legal note
]

What percentage
of people in this occupation are members of a union?

This occupation (Computer
Programmers and Interactive Media Developers
) is part of a larger group
called Computer and Information Systems Professionals (NOC 217).
According to the Labour Force Survey (2009), the unionization rate for this
group was 20%, while the unionization rate for all occupations was 31%.

[
Source: Labour
Force Survey – Statistics Canada

| Legal note
]

What percentage
of people in this occupation are self-employed?

The graph displays
the percentage of people in this occupation who are “self-employed”, according
to the 2006 Census, in comparison to the Canadian average across all
occupations.

[
Show Data Table ]

[
Hide Data Table ]

Self Employment

This Occupation

All Occupations

% Self-employed

11%

12%

As shown in the
graph, according to the 2006 Census, 11% of people in this occupation were
self-employed, while the average for all occupations was 12%.

The Labour Force
Survey also gives us some information about self-employment. This occupation (Computer
Programmers and Interactive Media Developers
) is part of a larger group
called Computer and Information Systems Professionals (NOC 217).
According to the Labour Force Survey (2009), 19% of workers in this group were
self-employed, while the average for all occupations was 16%.

[
Source: Labour
Force Survey – Statistics Canada

| Legal note
]

Job
Opportunities in the Canadian Forces

The Canadian
Forces is currently recruiting 2,800 Regular Force, and 5,400 part-time Reserve
Force members for a wide range of careers across Canada.

The mission of the
Canadian Forces is to protect Canada, defend North America in co operation with
the U.S., and contribute to international peace and security. On any given day,
about 8,000 Canadian Forces members – one third of our deployable force – are
preparing for, engaged in or returning from an overseas mission. At home,
Canadian Forces can bring the best available military resources from across
Canada to bear on a crisis or threat, wherever it occurs, nation-wide.

To learn about the
requirements and application process, visit FORCES.CA.

[
Source: Canadian
Forces – National Defence
]

Starting your
Own Business in Ontario

Starting a
business can be a rewarding undertaking, but it comes with its challenges.
Before starting a business in Canada, it is wise to do your own research. You
should also make sure that you are suited for entrepreneurship and that you
understand the significant effort required.

Whether you are
planning to come to Canada as a business immigrant, foreign investor or
self-employed person, the Canada Ontario Business Service Centre has a variety
of resources to help you plan or start a business in Ontario.

The COBSC now
offers their most popular business information in: Arabic, Chinese (Traditional),
Chinese (Simplified), Korean, Polish, Punjabi, Russian, Spanish, Urdu.

Canada Ontario Business Service Centre

1-888-576-4444

E-mail: ontario@canadabusiness.ca

Web site: Canada
Ontario Business Service Centre

[
Source: Canada-Ontario
Business Service Centre
]

Wages

 

This section
provides information on the wages earned by people in this occupation for
Canada and specific communities.

Local Wage
Information

This section
provides local information on wage rates. A number of factors can affect the
wage paid for the same occupation in different Canadian communities such as the
geographic location, labour agreements or availability of workers.

Community/Area

Wage ($/hr)

Reference Period

Low

Average

High

Windsor-Sarnia Area

20.33

31.28

43.50

2010

Information for other areas within Ontario.

Windsor-Sarnia Area

20.33

31.28

43.50

2010

London-Woodstock Area

20.00

29.43

37.50

2010

Kitchener-Waterloo-Barrie-Guelph Area

19.14

30.79

42.10

2010

Hamilton-Niagara Peninsula-Brantford Area

17.22

28.57

40.18

2010

Northeastern Ontario

20.33

31.28

43.50

2010

Kingston-Quinte-Pembroke Area

20.33

31.28

43.50

2010

Ottawa Region

22.00

33.83

46.12

2010

Toronto Region

20.75

31.33

42.10

2010

Ontario

20.33

31.28

43.50

2010

[
Source: Labour
Market Information – HRSDC
]

Job Futures
(provincial version)

Visit the
Provincial Job Futures for information on the current trends and the future
outlook for occupations in this province or territory. The Web site is a joint
effort of the federal, provincial and territorial governments.

You can view a
report specific to this occupation on Job Futures
(provincial version)

At the national
level, how much do people earn in this occupation?

The graph displays
the median hourly wage earned in this occupation in comparison to the Canadian
median wage across all occupations.

[
Show Data Table ]

[
Hide Data Table ]

Earnings

This Occupation

All Occupations

Median hourly wage in 2009

30.4 ($/hr)

21 ($/hr)

According to the
Labour Force Survey (2009), the median hourly wage for Computer Programmers and
Interactive Media Developers was $30.40. That is to say that half of all
workers in this occupation earned less than this amount and half earned more.
The median hourly wage for all occupations was $21.00.

According to the
same survey, the average wage for Computer Programmers and Interactive Media
Developers was $31.40.

[
Source: 2006
Census – Statistics Canada
/ Labour
Force Survey – Statistics Canada

| Legal note
]

OUTLOOK & PROSPECTS

 

This section
provides information on forecasted demand for the selected occupation. This
information can help you choose a place to live and work. In Canada, the
occupational demand can vary from one community to another. Occupational demand
increases and decreases for a number of reasons: changes in the technology, the
economy, a growth in natural resources, or a demand for a particular kind of
product or service.

Local Employment
Potential Information

The following
table identifies employment conditions for Windsor-Sarnia Area.

Communities/Areas

Employment Potential

Windsor-Sarnia Area

Employment conditions for other areas within Ontario.

Kingston-Quinte-Pembroke Area

Fair

London-Woodstock Area

Fair

Northeastern Ontario

Fair

Ottawa Region

Limited

Toronto Region

Fair

[
Source: Labour
Market Information – HRSDC
]

Provincial
Prospects

You can access Provincial/Territorial outlook and prospects information by
consulting: Provincial
Job Futures – Prospects
Web Site.

National Outlook
– 10-Year Projection (2009-2018)

This section
provides labour demand and labour supply projections for this occupation over
the 2009-2018 period.

The data in the
following table are derived from HRSDC’s Canadian Occupational Projection
System (COPS). COPS uses a variety of models to produce a detailed 10-year
labour market projection per broad skill level and per occupation at the
national level, which focuses on the trends of labour supply and labour demand
over the next ten years.

This occupation (Computer
Programmers and Interactive Media Developers
) is part of a larger
occupational group called Computer and Information Systems Professionals
(NOC 217).

Occupations in this
group

Information Systems Analysts and Consultants (2171)

Database Analysts and Data Administrators (2172)

Software Engineers and Designers (2173)

Computer Programmers and Interactive Media Developers (2174)

Web Designers and Developers (2175)

Employment
(non-student) in 2008

337,331

Median Age of
workers in 2008

38

Average Retirement
Age in 2008

62

Occupation
Projection for Canada

Over the 2006-2008
period, employment growth in this occupation was strong. The unemployment rate
decreased to reach a very low level in 2008. This suggests that there was a shortage
of workers in this occupation. In other words, the number of job openings
exceeded the number of job seekers.

Over the 2009-2018
period, an occupation will be in excess demand (a shortage of workers) if the
projected job openings (arising from expansion demand and replacement demand)
are greater than the projected job seekers (arising from school leavers,
immigration and mobility), while an occupation will be in excess supply (a
surplus of workers) if the projected job seekers are greater than the projected
job openings. For Computer and Information Systems Professionals, over
the period of 2009-2018, job openings are expected to total 131,006. It
is expected that 190,335 job seekers will be available to fill these job
openings.

Despite the recent
labour shortage in this occupation, it is expected that labour demand and
supply will be balanced over the 2009 2018 period, with a sufficient number of
job seekers to fill all the job openings. Job openings will mainly result from
employment growth. Fewer jobs will result from retirements as there are many
young workers in this occupation. Although the rate of employment growth in
this occupation will not reach the same level it did in the 1990s, it will
remain strong for the projection period. This is because computer technology is
now an integral part of the economy, which is becoming increasingly knowledge
based. However, changes in technology that facilitate remote communication will
increase competition in this industry since they will make it possible for
Canadian companies to outsource information and communications technologies and
development services to lower cost countries. Although labour demand will be
high, the number of job seekers is expected to be sufficient to fill all the
job openings in this occupation. In fact, the number of computer science school
leavers will be high since this field of study continues to be very popular
among young people. Immigration will also be an important source of job seekers
since computer related jobs remain one of the most attractive high-skilled
occupations for immigrants, given that skills and knowledge acquired abroad in
this field are easily transferable to Canada.

Projection
of Job Openings vs. Job Seekers for Canada

Category

Openings

%

Expansion Demand

82,986

63%

Retirements

35,022

27%

Deaths

8,060

6%

Emigration

4,939

4%

Projected Job Openings

131,006

100%

 

Category

Seekers

%

School Leavers

121,518

64%

Immigration

44,132

23%

Net Mobility

24,685

13%

Projected Job Seekers

190,335

100%

[
Source: Canadian
Occupational Projection System (COPS)

]

What proportion
of people in this occupation work full-time and part-time?

The graph displays
the proportion of people in this occupation who worked full-time and part-time
in comparison to the Canadian average across all occupations.

[
Show Data Table ]

[
Hide Data Table ]

Full Time / Part Time

This Occupation

All Occupations

% Full-time, 2009

96%

81%

% Part-time, 2009

4%

19%

 

According to the
Labour Force Survey (2009), 96% of workers in this occupation worked full-time,
compared to the average of 81% for all occupations.

[
Source: Labour
Force Survey – Statistics Canada

| Legal note
]

What proportion
of men and women work in this occupation?

The graph displays
the proportion of men and women in this occupation in comparison to the
Canadian average across all occupations.

[
Show Data Table ]

[
Hide Data Table ]

Gender

This Occupation

All Occupations

% Men

83%

52%

% Women

17%

48%

According to the
Labour Force Survey (2009), women represented 17% of workers in this
occupation, compared to the average of 48% for all occupations.

[
Source: 2006
Census – Statistics Canada
/ Labour
Force Survey – Statistics Canada

| Legal note
]

EDUCATION & TRAINING

 

This section
provides information on Canadian educational institutions and other
organizations that offer training for the occupation selected. Having proper
training and/or education is important in finding a job in Canada.

Important:
If you have received education or training outside of Canada, it may be
important to have your credentials assessed and evaluated to see if your
education is equivalent to Canadian standards (see Licence and
Certification
section).

CanLearn

 

CanLearn.ca is
Canada’s trusted source of information that supports awareness and
decision-making to help individuals save, plan and pay for post secondary
education and pursue future career opportunities.

CanLearn.ca was
developed by the Department of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada in
collaboration with provincial and territorial governments and Canadian
learning and career development organizations
.

Explore
the post-secondary education options that Canada has to offer in the CEGEPs,
Colleges and Universities Search. Browse detailed information about Canadian
universities, Canadian community colleges and CEGEPs, and find the school that
best suits your needs.

The
Program Search allows you to get detailed profiles, requirements and
application and admissions information for programs of study at Canadian
universities, community colleges and CEGEPs.

The
CanLearn Scholarship Search is a service provided in collaboration with
Studentawards.com. Studentawards.com is the leading FREE Canadian scholarship
search service devoted to helping high school, college and university students
find information on scholarships, bursaries, grants, and other forms of
financial assistance available from the private sector and not-for-profit
organizations.

[
Source: CanLearn
]

Educational
Programs Leading to this Occupation

This section provides educational programs listed
in the order in which they are most likely to supply graduates to this
occupation.

[
Source: 2006
Census – Statistics Canada
]

Local Training

Local Training
Information for Computer Programmers and Interactive Media Developers in
the area Windsor-Sarnia Area, Ontario.

University of
Windsor

401 Sunset Avenue

Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4

Telephone: (519) 253-4232

Fax: (519) 971-3653

http://www.cronus.uwindsor.ca/

University of Western Ontario

1151 Richmond Street

London, Ontario N6A 5B8

Telephone: (519) 661-2111

Fax: (519) 661-3388

http://www.uwo.ca/

University of Waterloo

200 University Avenue West

Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1

Telephone: (519) 885-1211

Fax: (519) 746-2882

http://www.uwaterloo.ca/

University of Guelph

50 Stone Road East

Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1

Telephone: (519) 824-4120

Fax: (519) 766-9481

http://www.uoguelph.ca/

[
Source: Labour
Market Information – HRSDC
]

FURTHER ASSISTANCE

 

This section will
help you learn about additional resources that may assist you in your job
search.

Service Canada
Centres Near You

Service Canada
offers single window access to a wide range of Government of Canada programs
and services for citizens. You can visit one of our 320 Service Canada Centres
across Canada, where you can get free Internet access, help on how to use the
Web, and answers from our specially trained staff to almost any question about
government services and benefits.

Service Centre

Hours of service

Language of Service

Address

(Map will open in new window)

Chatham-Kent – Service Canada Centre

Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm

English

French

120 Wellington Street West

Chatham

N7M 4V9

Building: Federal Building

View MapView Map

Leamington – Service Canada Centre

Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm

Peak hours: from 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm

English

French

215 Talbot Street East

Leamington

N8H 3X5

Building: Leamington Mall

View MapView Map

Sarnia – Service Canada Centre

Monday from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm

Tuesday from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm

Wednesday from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm

Thursday from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm

Friday from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm

English

French

529 Exmouth Street

Sarnia

N7T 5P6

View MapView Map

Wallaceburg – Service Canada Centre

Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm

English

French

786 Dufferin Avenue

Wallaceburg

N8A 2V3

Floor: 2

Building: Municipal Service Centre

View MapView Map

Windsor – Service Canada Centre

Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm

English

French

400 City Hall Square East

Windsor

N9A 7K6

View MapView Map

[Source:Service
Canada
]

Living in Canada

As you look for a
job in Canada, it will be important for you to also find a place to live. The Canada
Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)

has prepared the Newcomer’s
Guide to Canadian Housing
to help you find
a comfortable place to live in a friendly neighbourhood.

Canada
offers many different types of housing and a wide range of prices. Finding the
right place for you and your family to live will take some effort.

For more
information on living in Canada, consult the Welcome to
Canada
section of our site.

[Source:Canada
Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)
]

Going To Canada
Immigration Portal

Every
year, Canada welcomes thousands of new residents. Coming to Canada as an
immigrant is an exciting opportunity, but also a great challenge.

The Going to
Canada Immigration Portal
. provides
seamless on-line information and services from a variety of government and
non-government sources to help immigrants make informed decisions about coming
to Canada and better prepare them, before they arrive, for integration into the
Canadian labour market and society.

[Source:Going To Canada Immigration Portal]

Province /
Territory Link

The Government of Ontario offers complementary information at: Ontario
Immigration
.

List of
associations and unions

Associations and Unions are organizations that may
provide news to its members about networking events, professional development
and other common issues for people working in the same industry. For the list
of associations and unions, visit the following site: Labour
Market Information

Can I immigrate
to Canada to work in this field?

You may be
eligible to apply as a federal skilled worker if you have an arranged offer of
permanent employment from a Canadian employer, or if you have been living
legally in Canada for one year as an international student or temporary foreign
worker. Find out more about who is eligible to apply in the Federal skilled worker
section.

[
Source: Citizenship
and Immigration Canada
]

Municipal Link
for Newcomers

We invite you to
visit the City of
Windsor and the County of Essex

Web site. Supported by the Government of Ontario and Citizenship and
Immigration Canada, this Web site provides you with community information to
live and work in Windsor and Essex.

[
Source: The
City of Windsor and the County of Essex

]

 

My Job Duties &

My Job Duties &
Responsibilities

Wrote,  modify, integrate and test software code.Maintain  existing computer programs by making modifications as required.Identify  and communicate technical problems, processes and solutions.Support data communications and help  implement insurance business and intranet strategies, especially in the
development of Oracle DB, oracle application (forms and report) and MS Access. Provide

Prepare reports, manuals and other  documentation on the status, operation and maintenance of   Software.

Assist in the collection and  documentation of user’s requirements

Assist in the development of logical and  physical specifications

Research and evaluate a variety of  software products.

Hello Every One

Dear All

My name is Mohammad

I born in Qatar 1977 oct 8th , graduated in 1999 in computer science after that

I worked as insurance programmer using Oracle in 2005 I got married and I have

3 daughters Jude, Yara, and Salma.

Regard

Hamtini

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